Do you have questions?

Call 1800 651 535 for your no obligation saddle consultation. We love talking about saddles and can help you choose a saddle style and options for your needs. Feel free to call in and see us, or phone one of our saddlers, Ben, Daniel or Tom, with any questions you may have.

We have been making fender saddles since 1992, and have found that in only the most extreme horse accidents has the saddle tree been broken. It’s very unlikely that your saddle tree will be broken.

Mostly we find in these situations that the horse has lost condition from work or shortage of feed. A solution is to use a pad with a cutaway wither section to lift the saddle higher off the horse’s back. (See the Koda felt saddle pad with leather chambers on our Saddle Blankets page.)

If the style of horse you are riding has a high wither, the best solution is to have a saddle built on a tree designed to suit your horse. See our Saddle Options page.

Spring Bars are similar to those on a flap saddle with the fenders under the flap instead of over. Spring Bar fenders give more freedom of movement, especially forward, so someone who has been riding in a flap saddle would adjust to them easily. The Spring Bar fender has the added safety advantage that if the rider gets thrown and hung up, chances are that the fenders will slip off the spring bar.

Fenders over the tree are designed for a person who likes to ride fairly straight up and down, dressage or western style. Our saddles have a rock bar where the fender strap goes over the tree which has a pivoting affect as the fender moves back and forth with the leg.

Each saddle has an individual number which is recorded, together with all the information and specifications for that saddle. If you’ve had the opportunity to ride in a Kent Saddle, like it, and are interested in buying a similar saddle, simply phone with the saddle number and we can look up the relevant information.

Always keep in mind that if you are riding in someone else’s saddle, it may not be the right size, and the fenders may be the wrong length, which is not conducive to a comfortable ride. As a general guide, we recommend that if you are sitting in the saddle on the horse with fenders of the correct length, and there is room for the width of the flat of your hand between your thigh and the back of the knee pad, then the saddle is a good fit. Shortening the fenders changes the angle of your thighs and results in a tighter fit in the saddle. Conversely, lengthening the fenders gives more room.

Read our guide to choosing a saddle.

Sometimes the rider either gains or loses weight between the time of ordering and delivery, and obviously this will affect saddle fit. In the unlikely event that the saddle doesn’t fit you or your horse as well as you’d like, we will work with you for a good outcome. We ask that you don’t oil the saddle until you’re satisfied that it’s the right fit. A brochure on saddle care comes with every saddle (see our Saddle Care page).

As a general guide, we recommend that if you are sitting in the saddle on the horse with fenders of the correct length, and there is room for the width of the flat of your hand between your thigh and the back of the knee pad, then the saddle is a good fit. Shortening the fenders changes the angle of your thighs and results in a tighter fit in the saddle. Conversely, lengthening the fenders gives more room.

It depends on:

  • The type of country you are riding in (hilly or flat country);
  • The style of horse you are riding and whether the saddle fits the horse well;
  • If the horse is inclined to buck;
  • Your personal choice.

We recommend that you try without, especially with our cable rigging which balances the saddle really well.

Overly tight girths can cause great discomfort to the horse with reduced performance and more chance that they will misbehave or buck. If the saddle fits the horse well and is positioned correctly, girth up firmly from the near side and go to the off side to check the balance of the saddle and girth up slightly if necessary. You will notice that the girth will have some slack after some time in the saddle. That is ideal; it allows the horse to move more freely. A well fitted saddle with the correct saddle cloth doesn’t need to be girthed up very tight.
We simply say you’ll be satisfied no matter what. If you’re not satisfied, we’re not either. If you have a problem we want to be the first to know. You can be confident that you won’t be left with a saddle that doesn’t suit you or your horse.

It may have done when threads in saddles were made from hemp. Threads in saddles today are all synthetic so it is not an issue. We recommend neatsfoot blend for new saddles.

On average about 11kg mounted depending on size and mounts. This compares favorably with many felt lined flap saddles which can weigh 16-17kg, and western style saddles, which often weigh over 30kg. We are careful not to compromise strength to save weight.
No we don’t.